*



NaNoWriMo workshop groups fall 2017


Serendipity:
Betty
Elisha
Leo
Mary
Robert
Silas





Löbsterdawg:
Anna
Ayah
Jess
Maggie
Maya
Solomia





~~(((^ H'uh(n) ^)))~~
Angie
Darshan
Eli
Nathan
Pomona
Majerus









Nanowrimo end-of-month advice

Length to share with your group: At least five and not more than fifteen pages

How to whittle down:

  • What is the core of your novel?
  • What’s the most interesting part? The most original part?
  • What’s the most problematic part? The part where you feel you most need advice?
  • Where do you feel the writing was most fully realized, which sections are you most satisfied with?
  • Which section makes sense on its own? Which sections make sense together?

Be sure to offer context when it’s needed (brief intro? brief connecting details or thoughts) but only what’s needed. Err on the side of brevity.







Share your basic description of your project here


NaNoWriMo workshop groups survey:
  1. On a scale of 1–5, 1 being “not at all excited, pretty negative” and 5 being “very excited, quite positive” how excited and/or positive are you about sharing an excerpt of your project?
  2. Are there any classmates in this section with whom you’d rather not share your project, for any reason at all?(No assumptions will be made about this––could be because the person is your mortal enemy, could be because you admire them so much it will make them nervous, could be because they’re your best friend and the project will be a surprise present on their next birthday…)
  3. Are there any classmates you’d particularly like to be in a NaNoWriMo workshop group with, for any reasons? (No judgments or assumptions here either.)




Inspirational quotes for Thursday, the penultimate day of NaNo:

The reader is a friend, not an adversary, not a spectator.Jonathan Franzen


Finish what you’re writing. Whatever you have to do to finish it, finish it. —Neil Gaiman




Inspirational quote for Wednesday, November 29:


In A Room of One's Own (1929), Virginia Woolf wrote: "So long as you write what you wish to write, that is all that matters; and whether it matters for ages or only for hours, nobody can say. But to sacrifice a hair of the head of your vision, a shade of its colour, in deference to some Headmaster with a silver pot in his hand or to some professor with a measuring-rod up his sleeve, is the most abject treachery, and the sacrifice of wealth and chastity, which used to be said to be the greatest of human disasters, a mere flea-bite in comparison."




Write Everywhere! Screen shot.png



Day eleven:

“Plot is people. Human emotions and desires founded on the realities of life, working at cross purposes, getting hotter and fiercer as they strike against each other until finally there’s an explosion — that’s Plot.” — Leigh Brackett




Day ten:

The Creative Process.jpg




Day Seven: Zero Drafts and Goal setting


If you're struggling with feeling satisfied with what you've done so far, try thinking of what you're working on now not as a first draft, but as a "zero draft." Here's Justine Larbalestier on zero drafts.


For our goal setting today: Look at what you've done so far, and envision a goal for Monday, November 20. Including the writing time we'll have today and our writing time on that day, that's eight guaranteed writing days, plus any time you want and are able to spend outside class. Your goal could be quantitative (writing sixteen pages of memoir beyond what you have now, finishing the third chapter of your novel, etc.) or qualitative (getting to the point in the plot where the hospital floods, figuring out how the two characters who currently hate each other are going to begin falling in love, etc.) Try to set a goal that's reasonably realistic but still gives you something to aspire to and work toward.



Day Six:

Lynda Barry (on the inspiration for “Two Questions”): “I had forgotten that trying to write something good before I write anything at all is like refusing to give birth unless you know for sure it is going to be a very good baby."

Barry3.jpg




William Golding said, "Novelists do not write as birds sing, by thepush of nature. It is part of the job that there should be much routine and some daily stuff on the level of carpentry."




Examples of premise for some famous novels:

Moby Dick: One man’s obsessive quest to kill the white whale

Anna Karenina: A woman stifled by the limited roles dictated for her by her society and her family chooses passion over duty

The Awakening: A woman stifled by the limited roles dictated for her by her society and her family chooses freedom over duty

The Catcher in the Rye: A teenage boy runs away from school and spends a long weekend leading us around New York, telling us his life story, and teaching us how not to be a phony

Mrs. Dalloway: An upper-class woman in London throws a party and quietly defies the limitations of her life while a shell-shocked WWI veteran progressively succumbs to madness and despair.

{could add “[and the expectations of her gender roles]” and “[due to the limits of his life and the expectations of his gender roles]”}

Invisible Man: A man narrates his life as a black man in a deeply racist culture and in doing so shows us various ways that racism distorts people and renders them virtually invisible.


NaNo premises from previous years:

Teenage girl protagonist goes to Heaven, finds out her brother who died before her has gone to Hell, and joins a social justice protest movement of Heaven-ites protesting against the existence of Hell


Seventh grade girl endures bullying from another seventh grade girl who was, briefly, her friend. After learning that her bully has subsequently been sexually assaulted by one of their teachers, she’s faced with whether and how to help her enemy.


Guy applies to Harvard, finds his life taken over by the politics of the Harvard applicants’ Facebook groups


A man is convicted of a crime he didn’t commit. Struggling to find meaning in his prison existence, he begins tutoring other convicts and as a result begins to question some of his basic assumptions about human nature.

















Post-NaNoWriMo advice


Looking for some end-of-NaNoWriMo inspiration keep working on your novel at some point in the not-too-distant future? Here's a list of novels started during NaNoWriMo that have been published and some tips on where to go from hereif you want to finish your novel. Also, if you're interested, advice on how to add humor to your novel in the revision stage.



NaNoWriMo end-of-month advice


Length to share with your group: At least six and not more than eighteen pages.

How to choose or whittle down your excerpt:
  • What is the core of your novel?
  • What’s the most interesting part? The most original part? What’s the most problematic part? The part where you feel you most need advice?
  • Where do you feel the writing was most fully realized, which sections are you most satisfied with?
  • Which section makes sense on its own? Which sections make sense together?

Be sure to offer context when it’s needed. This might be in the form of a brief intro to the whole section, or brief connecting details between sections that jump around, or both; or it might take the form of thought on where you imagine a section is heading or how it might change in the future. But only offer context and thoughts when you feel it’s really needed. As much as possible, let the novel/project speak for itself. And in general, err on the side of brevity in any extra context and/or notes.








Scott Westerfield on the idea of the "Dialogue Spine"

Justine Larbalestier on "The Zen of Zero Drafts"



NaNo googledoc check-in questions:
1. What’s been the coolest or most fun thing about NaNoWriMo so far?2. What’s been the hardest thing?3. Tell me about your project:o What’s the genre?o How would you describe the premise?o Describe the world of the text in three sentences or fewer.o Tell me very briefly what you know about the plot so far.o Introduce me very briefly to one or two of your central characters (or, if you want, three or four).






Some Introductions To and ideas about Preparing For NaNoWriMo
Please keep in mind two differences between NaNoWriMo as these writers know it and our NaNoWriMo experience, should we choose to pursue it:

1. There will be no "word count"; the point will be to write every day of class, not to write a certain number of words.
2. You can write a novel, but you could also write in another genre (memoir, collection of short stories, collection of poems, graphic novel, etc.)

Quick introductions to NaNoWri Mo from pro writers Justine Larbalestier (author of Zombies vs. Unicorns, How to Ditch Your Fairy, and other novels) and Scott Westerfield (author of Leviathan and other novels)

Audrey Lyn Jeppson's NaNoWriMo intro post on her Taming of the Muse blog

Good basic introduction NaNo and to different ways to approach NaNo from Rachel Stephen, who has also begun a NaNo preparation community on Twitter, @prep_tober

Little Book Owl's "How to NaNoWriMo" video––This one is pretty long, but it offers some good advice

NaNo Tips from Justine Larbalestier and Scott Westerfield

(I'm linking my favorite posts from each of the above, but if you explore both blogs, there are many more
NaNo tips during November 2009 for each.)


Writing Outlines: The Case of Charles Dickens

































NaNoWriMo end-of-month advice


Length to share with your group: At least six and not more than sixteen pages

How to whittle down:
  • What is the core of your novel?
  • What’s the most interesting part? The most original part?
  • What’s the most problematic part? The part where you feel you most need advice?
  • Where do you feel the writing was most fully realized, which sections are you most satisfied with?
  • Which section makes sense on its own? Which sections make sense together?

Be sure to offer context when it’s needed (brief intro? brief connecting details or thoughts) but only what’s needed. Err on the side of brevity.


Young Writers' NaNo Prep Advic